Minimum Wage Requirements by State

January 26, 2016 Jordan Nottrodt

United States Minimum Wage 2016

This blog post is written for American businesses. If you run a Canadian company, click here for a list of Minimum Wage Requirements in Canada.

Minimum wage is the lowest hourly pay rate that an employer can pay an employee.

In the United States, the federal government issues a nationwide minimum wage. The current federal minimum is $7.25/hour, and generally, all states must pay no less than the statutory minimum wage.

Each state is able to set their own minimum wage as long as it is above the federal minimum and currently many of them have done so.

American employers are required to pay employees, at least, the minimum wage set by their state. It is the employer’s responsibility to adhere to the minimum wage requirements of their state or the federal minimum when applicable.

Service and hospitality workers who are tipped employees have their own minimum cash wage requirements, including a federal minimum of $2.13/hour. In turn, their tips make up the balance toward minimum wage or above.

Digit wants to let you know that he has our hamsters working on updating this post and this table. Don't worry, our software has been updated with all the latest minimum wage info. Our writer... she's a different story. In the meantime, here's the DOL webpage with the info you seek

State

Minimum Wage

Planned
Increases

 Alabama

$7.25 (Federal minimum)

Alabama has no state minimum wage law. 

 Alaska

$9.80

As of Jan. 1, 2017, there were no planned increases. 

 Arizona

$10.00

Annual increases tied to the cost of living. 

 Arkansas

$8.50 (for employers with 4 or more employees)

No planned increases. 

 California

$10.00 (25 or fewer employees)

$10.50 (26 or more employees)

(Several cities also have their own minimum wage laws)

From January 1, 2017, to January 1, 2022, the minimum wage will increase for employers employing 26 or more employees. This increase will be delayed one year for employers employing 25 or fewer employees, from January 1, 2018, to January 1, 2023. 

 Colorado

$8.31

Annual increase or decrease based on by cost of living.

 Connecticut

$9.60

January 1st, 2017 ($10.10)

 Delaware

$8.25

 

Washington D.C.

$10.50

July 1st, 2016 ($11.50)

 Florida

$8.05

Annual increase.

 Georgia

$5.15

 

 Hawaii

$8.50

January 1st, 2017 ($9.25)
 January 1st, 2018 ($10.10)

 Idaho

$7.25

 

 Illinois

$8.25

 

 Indiana

$7.25

 

 Iowa

$7.25

 

 Kansas

$7.25

 

 Kentucky

$7.25

 

 Louisiana

$7.25 (Federal minimum)

 

 Maine

$7.50

 

 Maryland

$8.75

July 1st, 2016 ($8.75)          July 1st, 2017 ($9.25)          July 1st, 2018 ($10.10)

 Massachusetts

$11.00

January 1st, 2017 ($11.00)

 Michigan

$8.90

 January 1st, 2018 ($9.25)

 Minnesota

$9.00/$7.25

August 1st, 2016 ($9.50/$7.75 Large/Small Employers)

 Mississippi

$7.25 (Federal minimum)

 

 Missouri*

$7.65

Annual increase or decrease based on by cost of living.

 Montana

$8.05/$4.00(Employers grossing $110,000 or less.)

January 1st, 2017

 Nebraska

$9.00

 

 Nevada

$8.25/$7.25 (with health benefits)

Annual increase. (July)

New Hampshire**

$7.25 (Federal minimum)

 

 New Jersey

$8.38

Annual increase.

 New Mexico

$7.50

 

 New York

$9.00

 

 North Carolina

$7.25

 

 North Dakota

$7.25

 

 Ohio

$8.10/$7.25(Employers grossing $283,000 or less.)

Annual increase.

 Oklahoma***

$7.25/$2.00

 

 Oregon

$9.25

Annual increase.

 Pennsylvania

$7.25

 

 Rhode Island

$9.60

 

 South Carolina

$7.25 (Federal minimum)

 

 South Dakota

$8.55

Annual increase.

 Tennessee

$7.25 (Federal minimum)

 

 Texas

$7.25

 

 Utah

$7.25

 

 Vermont

$10.00

 January 1st, 2018 ($10.50)

 Virginia

$7.25

 

 Washington

$9.47

Annual increase.

 West Virginia

$8.75

 

 Wisconsin

$7.25

 

 Wyoming

$5.15

 

*Missouri - The minimum wage requirements do not apply for federally covered employment, and the law exempts employees of a retail or service business grossing less than $500,000.

**New Hampshire – The minimum wage requirements do not apply to employees engaged in household labor, domestic labor, farm labor, outside sales representatives, summer camps for minors, newspaper carriers, non-professional ski patrol and golf caddies.

***Oklahoma – "The law defines an “employer” as having ten or more full-time workers in one place OR more than $100,000 of business a year." If you do not meet these requirements you fall under the $2.00/hour minimum wage. The $2.00 minimum wage also applies to full time students.

About the Author

Jordan Nottrodt

Jordan comes from a background of agency communications and strategic problem solving. She is passionate about inbound marketing and believes that the best content comes from knowing your audience and giving them exactly what they want. Working remotely for Wagepoint, she has been able to pursue her other passion of travelling the world one city at a time. Spark an immediate and detailed conversation with Jordan by mentioning Mad Men or Game of Thrones.

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